Join the Socialist Party Join us today!

Printable version Printable version

Facebook   Twitter

Link to this page: https://secure.socialistparty.org.uk/issue/328/9292

From The Socialist newspaper, 20 December 2003

Iraq Watch

OCCUPATION ARMED forces raided the Iraqi Federation of Workers' Trades Unions (IFTU) headquarters on 6 December, trashing the rooms and arresting eight members who were subsequently released without charge. Recently, the joint offices of the Worker-Communist Party of Iraq and the Union of Unemployed were also targeted in a raid by US-led armed forces.

Despite the overthrow of Saddam Hussein the former regime's anti-union laws are still in operation. In 1987 Saddam reclassified most Iraqi public sector workers as civil servants. As such, they were banned from organising unions and striking.

For Iraq's workers, occupation has clearly not meant 'liberation'.


ANOTHER GROUP of disgruntled Iraqis are 300 members of the 700-strong first battalion of the new US-trained Iraqi army. The recruits quit after complaining about their low pay of just $60 a month. Hardly a princely sum for becoming a target for anti-coalition forces targets.

And in the southern city of Basra, British occupying forces were violently confronted by 200 former Iraqi army officers who claim not to have received their pensions for four months.


A HUMAN Rights Watch report into the US-led war criticises the use of cluster bombs in civilian areas. It estimates that 13,000 cluster bombs were used that could have killed or wounded in excess of 1,000 people.

The report - Off Target - also says that in 50 targeted 'precision' strikes by the US Air Force killed dozens of Iraqi civilians but no Iraqi Baathist leaders.


THE OLD adage 'war is good for business' certainly holds true for the US multinationals involved in Iraq's post-war reconstruction. Having failed to 'internationalise' the occupation as part of its exit strategy, the US has exclusively awarded $18.6 billion worth of prime reconstruction contracts to coalition countries.

Countries critical of the US-led war - notably France, Germany and Russia (who are cultivating their own interests in the region) - are deemed ineligible for bidding by the Pentagon.

In a direct snub to these critics a Pentagon spokesperson said: "If a country decides to contribute forces to Iraq... they would immediately be eligible for this [bidding] consideration."

Why not click here to join the Socialist Party, or click here to donate to the Socialist Party.


In The Socialist 20 December 2003:

A living grant not tuition fees

Socialist Party Wins Vote Opposing Fees on Coventry City Council

Saddam's capture - Not The "Beginning Of The End" in Iraq

Iraq Watch

When Big Business Rules Universities

London weighting: Lessons Of The Strike Action


 

Home   |   The Socialist 20 December 2003   |   Join the Socialist Party

Subscribe   |   Donate  




Related links:

Iraq:

triangleAssange arrest: US and allied governments seeking revenge for exposing dirty wars

triangleFilm: Vice - Dick Cheney - a cold and calculating opportunist

triangle40 years since the Iranian revolution: Learning the lessons for today's new working-class struggles

triangleThe ongoing capitalist crisis and the struggle for a socialist world

triangle15 years since the invasion of Iraq: what we said

US:

triangleImperialist tensions escalate as world economy teeters

triangleProbation hostel rest room win

triangleMass movement topples governor of Puerto Rico

triangle50 years since Apollo 11 - 'One giant leap': how political conflict launched the moon landing

War:

triangle70 years since the publication of Nineteen Eighty-Four: "But if there was hope, it lay in the proles"

triangleSri Lanka - Ten years after the brutal end of the war

triangleWhat lies behind the US-China trade war?

Occupation:

triangleHarland and Wolff occupation

triangleHarland and Wolff occupation continues - renationalise to save the shipyard

International

International

18/9/19

South Africa

Violence against women in South Africa: how should organised workers respond?

11/9/19

London

West Papuans demand self-determination in London

11/9/19

South Africa

South Africa: Xenophobic violence - a product of failed capitalist policies

11/9/19

Far right

Far right makes gains in Germany

4/9/19

Hong Kong

Hong Kong protests: No let-up in trial of strength

28/8/19

Italy

Italy: Governing coalition fractures as Salvini looks to capitalise on crisis

14/8/19

Hong Kong

Pro-democracy protests continue to rage

14/8/19

Kashmir

Kashmir crisis: Stop the attack on democratic rights

31/7/19

Puerto Rico

Mass movement topples governor of Puerto Rico

31/7/19

Hong Kong

Hong Kong: the struggle for democratic rights escalates

17/7/19

Greece

Greece elections: Syriza ousted amid voter disillusionment

17/7/19

Israel

Interview: protests over killing in Israel

17/7/19

Sudan

Sudan masses mobilise against state repression

3/7/19

Ireland

Irish health workers' anger boils over into strike action

3/7/19

Turkey

New opportunity to build working-class fightback after voters punish Erdogan

triangleMore International articles...


Join the Socialist Party
Subscribe to Socialist Party publications
Donate to the Socialist Party
Socialist Party Facebook page
Socialist Party on Twitter
Visit us on Youtube

LATEST POSTS

CONTACT US

Phone our national office on 020 8988 8777

Email: info@socialistparty.org.uk

Locate your nearest Socialist Party branch Text your name and postcode to 07761 818 206

Regional Socialist Party organisers:

Eastern: 0798 202 1969

East Mids: 0773 797 8057

London: 020 8988 8786

North East: 0784 114 4890

North West 07954 376 096

South East: 020 8988 8777

South West: 07759 796 478

Southern: 07833 681910

Wales: 07935 391 947

West Mids: 02476 555 620

Yorkshire: 0114 264 6551

ABOUT US

ARCHIVE

Alphabetical listing


September 2019

August 2019

July 2019

June 2019

May 2019

April 2019

March 2019

February 2019

January 2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999