The Socialist

The Socialist 24 February 2009

Organise to defend jobs


Organise to defend jobs

Car industry in crisis: Death of jobs by a thousand cuts

Jobs protest continues

Workers march for jobs in Cardiff

Fight to save Royal Mail


What do union members get from Labour link?


Ireland: workers say 'We won't pay for your crisis'

General strike movement grips island of Guadeloupe

Kashmir: Health workers take strike action


Iran 1979: A revolution that was taken from the working class


ECB suffers Stanford hangover


Defend Yahya Al Faifi campaign

BNP bigots retreat under pressure

Greenwich: "Hands off my school"

Look at the gravy train!

Devon residents against incinerators


Leeds journalists strike against job cuts

Successful launch for United Left

Manchester Unison: Good vote for left

Protest at the Unison witch-hunt - date change

 
 

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Jobs protest continues

Public meeting on lessons of the Lindsey oil refinery strike with Keith Gibson (speaking) and Jerry Hicks, photo Paul Mattsson

Public meeting on lessons of the Lindsey oil refinery strike with Keith Gibson (speaking) and Jerry Hicks, photo Paul Mattsson

On Wednesday 18 February hundreds of construction workers picketed again outside Staythorpe power station, near Newark, to protest against the exclusion by Alstom of UK labour from jobs on the site. 60 workers at Staythorpe walked out again despite being threatened with the sack.

Keith Gibson, GMB Lindsey Oil Refinery (LOR) and Alistair Tice

250 workers from Easington, East Yorkshire, struck for the day to join the protest, which was supported by delegations from several other sites including Lindsey Oil Refinery and Fiddlers Ferry.

However frustration is growing with the trade union officials' strategy of delegated protests, lobbying MPs and talking to the employers.

On 24 February there was another mass picket and march into Newark with big support for victimised union activist John McEwan's call for sites to take strike action to maximise attendance. Nearly all the pickets support the call for an industry-wide one day national strike and march on Parliament, first proposed by Socialist Party supporters at the recent national shop stewards' meeting. An unofficial shop stewards network meeting has now been called for Saturday 28 February by the Lindsey Oil Refinery strike committee to co-ordinate the campaign and name a date for action.

As Wally Murray from Easington said: "If the trade union officials won't back us because of the anti-union laws, I'll call for action. I'm not scared of the law because I've got nothing to lose!"

It is vital that this stewards' meeting adopts a clear set of class demands to counter the deliberate media misrepresentation of the dispute as being anti-foreigner. Whilst there is still some "British Jobs for British Workers" feeling, most workers realise that their fight is not with the foreign workers but with the employers who are using migrant labour to undermine jobs, pay and conditions achieved under the national agreement (NAECI).

Several pickets told how the bosses are deliberately segregating the foreign workers. One said: "I used to talk football with the Italian lads but now management won't let them talk to us." Another explained how at Langage power station in Plymouth, Polish workers had walked out in solidarity over a health and safety issue.

It is the EU's pro-business laws, directives and court rulings that allow employers to get away with these attacks on hard-won pay rates, terms and conditions.

The Acas inquiry into the LOR dispute has found that the employers did nothing illegal. We already knew that! That's the whole point. As Socialist Party member Keith Gibson from LOR said: "Wildcat strike action broke the anti-union laws, now we've got to change the Posted Workers Directive laws. The victory at Lindsey secured NAECI rates for the Italian workers with trade union oversight to check its implementation. We're fighting for this throughout the construction industry."

New Labour's slavish support for the bosses means there is widespread support to stop trade union money being paid to the Labour Party.

37 pickets signed the Campaign for a New Workers' Party declaration and 25 copies of The Socialist were sold.

  • Shop Stewards Network meeting, called by the LOR strike committee: Saturday 28 February, 12 noon - 5pm. Grosvenor House Hotel, Charter Square, Sheffield.
  • For more information call: 07743 135183.


    Watch videos of Keith Gibson and Jerry Hicks (Unite Amicus general secretary candidate) speaking at joint Socialist Party / Respect meeting


    In this issue


    No Job Cuts

    Organise to defend jobs

    Car industry in crisis: Death of jobs by a thousand cuts

    Jobs protest continues

    Workers march for jobs in Cardiff

    Fight to save Royal Mail


    Campaign for a New Workers Party

    What do union members get from Labour link?


    International socialist news and analysis

    Ireland: workers say 'We won't pay for your crisis'

    General strike movement grips island of Guadeloupe

    Kashmir: Health workers take strike action


    Marxist analysis: history

    Iran 1979: A revolution that was taken from the working class


    Sport

    ECB suffers Stanford hangover


    Socialist Party campaigns

    Defend Yahya Al Faifi campaign

    BNP bigots retreat under pressure

    Greenwich: "Hands off my school"

    Look at the gravy train!

    Devon residents against incinerators


    Socialist Party workplace news

    Leeds journalists strike against job cuts

    Successful launch for United Left

    Manchester Unison: Good vote for left

    Protest at the Unison witch-hunt - date change


     

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